Jul 102011
 

U.S. Prison Population_2008

U.S. Prison Population in 2008. Louisiana has the highest incarceration rate.

The number of faces behind bars is increasing everywhere on the globe. Due to the collapsing penal system in the USA, the government is forced to enact laws that provide for the early release of elder, non-violent offenders. Yet, those released individuals remain on probation and, therefore, in the system. The higher the prison population rate (per 100,000 of national population), the more likely innocent inmates are confined. Louisiana alone is the prison “nation” number one.

When one compares the U.S. states with each other, and the USA with other countries (the poor and the rich), one realizes that the incarceration rate is not only the consequence of crime, politics and the lack of equalization of wealth, but it is also a matter of culture. The social focus in the USA is the South, once known for plantations and slavery. Nowadays, it is still the “Bible belt” that clings to the death penalty. Its “correctional” facilities on large grounds and the often brown and black people in prison clothes working the fields remind of old times.

Especially in rural areas where jobs are rare, each employee at local jails or the Department of Corrections, their families and friends enhance the lobby of the prison industry. They need convicted people to make a living and they cannot have an interest in a decrease of the prison population. Better basic education in the country and more alternative jobs would improve the chance for innocent prisoners to be heard and listened to by voters, and thus, by politicians as judges, district attorneys, sheriffs, legislators and governors.

The Innocent in Prison Project International (IIPPI) compiled information from the U.S. Census 2010, the Bureau of Justice Statistics, and the International Centre for Prison Studies. Today, on July 10, 2011, IIPPI provides and illustrates the data in graphics. Read on at http://www.iippi.org/pdf/population_poverty_prisoners_usa2011_statistics.pdf .

The U.S. Census of 2010 published a map on January 6, 2014, which shows how many prisoners are housed in each of the counties (Louisiana: parishes) throughout the USA. Go to http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/special/business/prisoners/index.html?template=iframe

The World Incarceration Rate graphic of 2014 by the Prison Policy might interest you as well. It does not necessarily mean that other countries or nations are more “human” than the USA (several are definitely not!), but this graphic by the Prison Policy gives a feeling of how many people are incarcerated by (U.S.) state compared to all other countries in the world. Go to the site, click on the graphic to enlarge, and see it all! Go to www.prisonpolicy.org/global/

Here is another data point: the incarceration of women in the USA and its global context. “Only 5% of the world’s female population lives in the U.S., but the U.S. accounts for nearly 30% of the world’s incarcerated women.”
http://www.prisonpolicy.org/global/women/

Update of February 2015:
Report by the VERA Institute of Justice: “Incarceration’s Front Door: The Missuse of Jails in America
Report by the Brennan Center for Justice: “Louisiana Fact Sheet-What Caused The Crime Decline?

Law Professor Bill Quigley at the Loyola University New Orleans names 40 reasons why minorities are mayorities in jails and prisons. (June 2, 2015)

How Germany does Prison – Americans on a mind-boggling incarceration road trip. (from June 16th through June 21st 2015)

This might interest you as well: Routine Character Assassination of Innocents

Please follow and like us:
0
Jul 052011
 

Louisiana’s legislators have enacted 402 new laws. Twenty-nine of them concern the legal and penal system in particular.

House Bill (HB) 5/ Act 24 authorizes sheriffs and deputy sheriffs with at least 16 years of active service to purchase their service firearms upon retirement.

House Bill (HB) 55/ Act 26  prohibits certain sex offenders from using or accessing social networking websites, chat rooms, and peer-to-peer networks.

House Bill (HB) 187/ Act 30 exempts sex offenders from provision that provides, without charge, state identification cards to persons of certain age.

Senate Bill (SB) 18/ Act 41 provides relative to the chief of police in the town of Simmesport. (8/15/11)

House Bill (HB) 131/ Act 74 amends the crime of failure to register to include the failure to comply with sex offender drivers’ license and state identification card requirements.

House Bill (HB) 216/ Act 83 amends provisions of law regarding probable cause determinations.

House Bill (HB) 235/ Act 87 provides that the 24-hour stay following mistrial applies to writ application for review by all courts with appellate jurisdiction.

House Bill (HB) 264/ Act 91 creates the crime of unlawful production, manufacturing, distribution, or possession of law enforcement badges.

Senate Bill (SB) 202/ Act 153 provides relative to the membership, duties and operations of the parole board and pardon board.

House Bill (HB) 14/ Act 159 provides relative to the carrying of weapons by federal judges.

House Bill (HB) 72/ Act 161 provides for the training of all chiefs of police.

House Bill (HB) 106/ Act 168 Requires reporting from providers of home incarceration or electronic monitoring services to DPS&C.

House Bill (HB) 414/ Act 186 revises and consolidates statutes providing for the diminution of sentence.

House Bill (HB) 111/ Act 218 provides with respect to court-ordered probation supervision fees.

House Bill (HB) 121/ Act 219 increases probation and parole fees by ten dollars.

House Bill (HB) 122/ Act 220 provides for the imposition of a fee to defray the cost of presentence investigations.

House Bill (HB) 116/ Act 250 prohibits the destruction of biological evidence collected pursuant to the investigation of certain criminal offenses.

House Bill (HB) 129/ Act 252 provides the La. Supreme Court Committee on Bar Admissions with access to criminal history information of bar examination applicants.

House Bill (HB) 138/ Act 253 provides with respect to eligibility for parole consideration for certain elderly inmates.

House Bill (HB) 285/ Act 262 increases the amount of monetary compensation for wrongful convictions.

House Bill (HB) 374/ Act 282  provides relative to the powers granted to elected police chiefs in municipalities governed by the Lawrason Act.

House Bill (HB) 392/ Act 283 provides with respect to criminal background checks for persons seeking employment.

House Bill (HB) 401/ Act 284 increases penalties for domestic abuse battery.

House Bill (HB) 416/ Act 285 amends timing of parole eligibility for certain offenders.

Senate Bill (SB) 182/ Act 312 prohibits any offender sentenced to the legal custody of the Department of Public Safety and Corrections to establish an account on any Internet-based social networking website. (8/15/11)

Senate Bill (SB) 232/ Act 318 provides for registry and notification by sex offenders and a sexual assault task force.

House Bill (HB) 305/ Act 349 provides for the reduction of a defendant’s sentence for substantial assistance in an investigation.

House Bill (HB) 353/ Act 366 provides for a uniform fines and costs assessment form for criminal cases.

Please follow and like us:
0

Enjoy this blog? Please spread the word :)